September as Mental Health Awareness Month: Redditor's take on giving support to colleagues coping with mental health issues

SINGAPORE: A social worker took to social media to share that her boss had shamed her for quitting to secure higher pay at another social service agency.

“I’m in the not-for-profit industry, working as a social worker,” u/crazyb***h294838484 wrote on r/askSingapore on Jan 5. “Was hoping to get my boss’ blessing, but got shamed instead. Boss insinuated that I should be working for passion, and be loyal and faithful to my company who has been so supportive towards me, and provided so much learning and experience.”

The social worker said that the comments made by her boss made her feel like a “dirty little materialistic b***h” for wanting to change jobs and get paid more.

She then asked her fellow Singaporean Redditors if this was a normal reaction from bosses or if it was “just the nature of non-profit organisations”?

“How should I deal with this?” she added.

Redditors: ‘Passion doesn’t pay the bills’

Many Redditors defended her after learning about her boss’s actions, claiming she was toxic.

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“Lol ur boss is toxic. Since after u serve ur notice and leave, jus leave the past in past and forget about him. People do leave for higher grounds. Staying in that company won’t pay ur bills. All the best in ur new co.!” one Redditor commented.

“Your boss just proved that your decision to leave was right. Passion doesn’t pay the bills. This isn’t a volunteer work. If the company runs out of funding, they will retrench you with no qualms for your loyalty and faithfulness. Don’t feel bad, OP. Move on,” another said.

“Passion and loyalty doesn’t guarantee food on the table. Don’t look back. Get that bigger paycheck and improve your life. Your boss is just salty he’s gonna lose you,” one Redditor added.

How to deal with your “negative boss”

If your boss reacts negatively to your resignation, try to understand their point of view and help them with any challenges they may encounter once you leave the company.

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Here are a few strategies to make your resignation go more smoothly:

Express gratitude. Don’t forget to thank your boss and coworkers for the valuable skills and experience you’ve gained through your role.

Provide assistance. Because resigning can disrupt staffing, volunteer to find or train your successor. Offer to meet with candidates, develop interview questions specific to the position, or train current staff members to carry out your responsibilities.

Avoid leaving any unfinished work behind. If possible, try to finish any work that needs to be completed before you depart. Make notes on your work to document how you finished certain tasks that someone else might need to reference in the future. Share the digital notes online so anyone can access them after you leave.

Inform clients. Notifying your long-term or repeat clients of your departure via phone call or email could be helpful. If your clients will be assigned to a different staff member, introduce the employee and provide their contact information.

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Ensuring a seamless transition for your clientele can sustain their satisfaction and project a more polished and caring image for the company.