SINGAPORE — A netizen took to social media after a tray of eggs his sister recently bought all contained two yolks. While at first, he thought they had only been lucky, he later wondered if the eggs they bought were fake ones.

“My sister bought a tray of eggs yesterday. She was thrilled when she cracked open the first one and found two yolks therein. Quite luckily right, 1/1000 chance to find an egg with double yolk,” wrote Facebook user Ng Chin Kok Danny on the COMPLAINT SINGAPORE page on Monday (Feb 13).

But then he added that the next four she cracked open were also the same.

He posted a video of another two they opened later, writing, “It appears that the whole tray of eggs are all with double yolk. Was she extremely lucky, or did she just get a tray of fake eggs (with some standard errors when producing them)?? Anyone else with similar experience?”

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Commenters on Mr Ng’s post were dubious about the eggs and told him to be careful.

One told him, “avoid and discard.”

Throw them away. Don’t eat them. Too risky,” said another.

Others had questions of their own.

Some said, however, that double-yolk eggs are normal.

Others congratulated Mr Ng, since eggs with double yolks are supposed to symbolize good luck.

Double-yolk eggs are a rare phenomenon, occurring in around one out of every 1000 eggs, and are a result of a chicken releasing two yolks into the same shell.

This occurs with young chickens whose reproductive systems have not fully matured, or with older chickens that are almost at the end of their egg-producing period, eggsafety.org says.

Fake eggs, on the other hand, were first made in the 1990s, and a decade later, spread all over China. They’re manufactured from resin, starch, coagulant, sodium alginate, resin, pigment, and other ingredients. /TISG

https://theindependent.sg/eggs-are-not-expensive-if-you-compare-to-pm-salary-most-expensive-in-the-world-netizens-express-concern-over-high-food-prices/