Singaporeans roast netizen claiming knitting is dangerous on the bus

3076
Photo: Facebook screengrab/ Singapore Silly Cyclists

So maybe there’s something to the ‘snowflake’ label after all? One netizen posted about seeing a woman ‘knitting’ on a bus, and called it ‘quite dangerous.’

She even went as far as expressing hope that the bus company can prevent sharp objects from being brought onboard their vehicles.

On the Facebook page Singapore Silly Cyclists, a person named Sandy wrote, “I saw someone knitting on the bus, this is quite dangerous. What happen if the bus jam brake? The needle might poke someone in the head. I hope bus company can stop passenger from bringing sharp object on bus.”

The post came with a video of a woman peacefully crocheting something while riding a bus.

Aaand then the ridicule flowed in 3…2…1…

As you can imagine, commenters went to town ridiculing the original poster. Comments ranged from the sarcastic

To comparing her to the woman named Jovina in the viral video from a Go-Jek driver last week, whom she accused of locking her in his car

To corrective

To mocking (again referencing the Jovina incident, wherein the passenger said, “Is it because I’m Chinese?”)

To pitying


To challenging

To downright mean, which we choose to refrain from giving an example of.

The moral of this story seems to be this: chill. People have been knitting, or in this case, crocheting in moving vehicles for a long time now, and untoward incidents have yet to be reported. In fact, activities such as these are proven to have a calming effect, and may even help those stuck in traffic to keep their cool.

However, mothership.sg points out that this is not the first time the dangers of knitting on public transport has been drawn attention to. Apparently in 2015, someone was alarmed enough to the Straits Times saying, “If the woman is pulling the needle in an upward movement and is caught unexpectedly by a sudden staggering of the train, an involuntary jerk of the hand holding the needle may cause the needle to jab at a fellow commuter sitting or standing close by.

There will be very serious consequences if the needle impales an eye or other body part of a nearby commuter who could not move away in time. How can the injured commuter seek recourse?”

In the meantime, let’s all hope that the coming warm weather will help melt away the snowflakes from our midst.