Netizens call out rich travel blogger for condescending post on locals not fully utilising Singapore passport

Daniel Peters FB

One of the bloggers at travel blog, A Girl and A Bald Traveller, has earned the ire of netizens after writing a condescending post on how Singaporeans don’t fully utilise the powerful Singapore passport.

The writer, the Bald Traveller, is a Singaporean himself. Asserting that the Singapore passport would be “more useful in the hands of an African refugee,” he criticised how Singaporeans are too tied down to their commitments – to “study, graduate, get a job, get a car, get a partner, get a flat, have a family, retire, then die”.

He also claimed that locals prefer tourist-friendly travel locations due to some kind of “white supremacy inferiority complex” and that Singaporeans are ignorant of other countries, thinking that certain nations are unsafe or still at war.

The writer also claimed that Singaporeans make excuses that they are too financially strapped to travel while they can afford eating out at expensive restaurants and afford purchasing pricey items.

The Bald Traveller asserted that when it comes to travel, locals “prostitute themselves to Instagram” and flock to popular destinations they can be photographed at, and bragged that he would bet any one of his Rolex watches that a “typical” Singaporean would wish to travel to see the Northern Lights, Cherry Blossoms in Japan and the Grand Canyon, Statue of Liberty and Niagara Falls in the USA:

Netizens called the Bald Traveller out for his “illogical” post and said that the post seems aimed at boasting about what a well-travelled “non-conformist” he is. The writer, however, vigorously defended his views.

In one instance, he rather condescendingly said that there are other bloggers who write about “rainbows and unicorns in a really polite, encouraging manner” and that readers could visit those sites instead if his blog is not their cup of tea:

The flak ultimately seemed to be too much for the Bald Traveller who chose to remove the article from the blog temporarily:

Check out some highlights from the original article, along with hilarious commentary, here:

sorry but that blogpost about our Singaporean passport isn't "food for thought" it's embarrassingly narrow-minded and…

Posted by Daniel Peters on Monday, 5 March 2018

8 COMMENTS

    • “wet in his pants”???

      You have just coined a new phrase?

      People usually say “wet behind the ears”.

      Wish commenters in Independent can write a little more decent and respectable English…

  1. He is bloody right that these Singaporeans are too tied down to their commitments – to “study, graduate, get a job, get a car, get a partner, get a flat, have a family, retire, then die”.

    AND MAKE SINGAPOREAN A RIPE to be ripped off by FT. They condescend us because the grandfather here sided with them. The preferred. So Sinkies should vote out those who let us be shamed and stepped on.

  2. Just few weeks ago , I saw Tan Chuan Jin and his wife go makan, then few days ago I saw Masagos bring his children out to East Coast , then yesterday again I saw Ong Ye Kung and his wife/gf , I guess I know them , they don’t even know me as I am a low class useless poor man who stood in front of Sinkapoorean

  3. And how would a SGP passport with visa free entry to many countries help “refugees” claim residency and build a new life? An article that generalises Singaporeans on their travel patterns and Africans as refugees.

  4. he wrote another blog post on how he manages to save so much monies for his travels. one reason was because he decided how much he is worth to his company: $15000/month! and that’s before changing jobs and taking a pay cut! of course you earn 5 figures a month sure can go holidays all you want!

  5. I have read his blog. There is a lot of truth in what he wrote. He was merely talking about the typical travel habits of Singaporeans – direct and to the point. Another blog post on how he managed to save for 3-monthly vacations in Europe is also sound financial advice coming from a banker.

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