Featured News Morning brief: Coronavirus update for June 24, 2020

Morning brief: Coronavirus update for June 24, 2020

The United States has the highest number of coronavirus cases, with 2,387,161 infections, followed by Brazil (1,145,906) and Russia (599,705)

Author

Date

Category

- Advertisement -

As of 8 am, June 24, 2020:

World count: 9,178,773 cases, 4,595,846 recoveries, 474,513 deaths

There are now 9,178,773 confirmed cases of the Covid-19 worldwide. The United States has the highest number of coronavirus cases, with 2,387,161 infections, followed by Brazil (1,145,906) and Russia (599,705). 

There have been 470,665 deaths from the coronavirus all over the globe since the pandemic began. The US has the highest number of deaths in the world, with 122,926 fatalities from Covid-19, followed by Brazil (52,645), and the United Kingdom (42,927).

474,513 people worldwide have recovered from the coronavirus.

Singapore: 119 additional cases, 405 more discharged, 3 community cases

The Ministry of Health (MOH) said on June 23 that there are 119 new Covid-19 cases in the country, of which 3 is a community cases. The other 116 cases are of Work Permit holders living in dormitories. Singapore now has a total of 42,432 confirmed cases, with an additional 405 discharged from hospital. A total of 35,995 individuals have recovered.

- Advertisement -

Of the active coronavirus cases in Singapore, 192 are in hospital, and 1 is in critical condition in intensive care. 6,219 are in community facilities. Twenty-six people in Singapore have died of complications due to Covid-19 infection, and eleven people infected with the coronavirus have died from other causes.

World’s number 1 tennis player positive for coronavirus

Novak Djokovic, the number one male tennis player in the world has tested positive for Covid-19. Mr Djokovic participated in a small tournament he had organized for fundraising as well as to help other tennis players get into shape. Several others involved in the tournament have also tested positive for the coronavirus, including Mr Djokovic’s wife Jelena, as well as Bulgarian tennis player Grigor Dimitrov, who had been slated to play in the finals, which were called off. Mr Djokovic said, “I am extremely sorry for each individual case of infection. I hope that it will not complicate anyone’s health situation and that everyone will be fine. I will remain in self-isolation for the next 14 days, and repeat the test in five days.”

EU considering barring travelers from the US

While the European Union has opened borders among member states, it is considering recommending blocking visitors from the United States due to the rising number of cases in the US. An EU diplomat said, “The criteria will be focused on circulation of the virus.” He added that Brussels may prohibit travelers from countries “where the virus is circulating most actively.” Ultimately,  each country decides on whom they will allow to visit, and no final decisions have been announced.

UK: Government urged to prepare for second wave of infections

Officials from the medical, nursing and public health fields in the United Kingdom are urging the British government to set up a cross-party review in preparation for a possible second wave of Covid-19 infections. They wrote in a letter, “As stakeholders and leaders of the UK’s medical, nursing and public health professions, we urge you to establish such a review. We think there’s a strong case for an immediate assessment of national preparedness, with the first results available no later than August, and that all its work should be completed by the end of October.” The group added that the review should “focus on those areas of weakness where action is needed urgently to prevent further loss of life and restore the economy as fully and as quickly as possible.”  

US: Pandemic could cause 500,000 fewer births

New research says the US may see a decrease of around 300,000 to 500,000 births because of the coronavirus. Dr Rahul Gupta, chief medical and health officer at March of Dimes in New York, said on Monday, ”When we started to do the math, we looked at the 1918 pandemic — as did Brookings — and we saw that there was about a 10% drop in fertility about nine to 10 months after peak mortality. A drop in 10% or 15% or 20% in the next few years could really spell trouble. The economic and demographic implications that stem from a severe drop in pregnancies could have a tremendous impact on the next generation, which is why this is an important and very serious issue.”

President of Poland to be tested for Covid-19 before meeting Donald Trump on June 24

The first head of state to visit the US since the pandemic began, Polish President Andrzej Duda, will undergo a Covid-19 test before meeting with President Trump at the White House on Wednesday. Mr Duda is expected to discuss the relocation of US troops from Germany to Poland, trade and energy issues, among others.

No evidence of herd immunity for coronaviruses—expert

American scientist and author William Haseltine commented on the complexity of coronaviruses, even as the number of young people infected by Covid-19 in the US continues to grow. “I call this virus the ‘get it and then your body forgets it.’ This is not a standard virus that you’re going to get herd immunity. There is no evidence of herd immunity for coronaviruses. It does not exist. Every year, the same four coronaviruses come back to give us colds. … If you have one of those coronaviruses, it can cause the exact same disease a year later. We now know from studies that you can just watch immunity fade over a two-month period. It doesn’t disappear, but it fades in that short of period. So, there isn’t such a thing as herd immunity. It’s a fantasy. It happens for some viruses. It doesn’t look like it’s going to happen for this one.” —/TISG

Read also: Virus cases top nine million as WHO says pandemic ‘accelerating

Virus cases top nine million as WHO says pandemic ‘accelerating’

 

- Advertisement -
72,000FansLike
1,000FollowersFollow
4,000FollowersFollow
1,000SubscribersSubscribe