Almost half the graduates from private schools can't find jobs but we are importing plane-loads of foreign PMETs

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I refer to the article in ST titled, ‘Private school graduates find it harder to land jobs: Poll‘. It said more than 70,000 Singaporeans pursue degrees and diplomas through the private education sector and a broad-based survey released yesterday showed that many of them are having difficulties landing a job.

Only 58 per cent of the fresh graduates from our private sector tertiary institutions who had no prior working experience found full-time jobs within six months of completing their studies. Another 21 per cent managed to find only part-time or contract work.

This is worrying!

It is downright naive for Mr Ong Ye Kung, Acting Minister for Education (Higher Education and Skills), to remind Singaporeans that one should not pursue a degree and that the SkillsFuture initiative of the Government is opening up more varied pathways for Singaporeans.

Having spent tens of thousands of dollars for Singaporeans going to the private sector tertiary education institutions, like SIM Global Education, or even overseas universities to pursue a structured degree education lasting for up to three years or more and they can’t even land a job, what bloody good can a $500 SkillsFuture short-term course do? It don’t make any sense at all!

Meanwhile, a jobless Singaporean PMET that I know lamented that he has collected a thick file of certificates for courses conducted by agencies approved by WDA and underwent skills upgrading funded by the $500 SkillsFuture, supplementing his basic diploma from a local polytechnic but have yet to land a job.

On the other hand, we are importing plane-loads of foreign PMETs on Employment Passes with inferior degrees from third-world countries and they are having a field day taking up PMET jobs, brutally denied of the locals.

Not to mention that the Government lavished hundreds of millions of our money sponsoring so-called scholars from third world countries to our public universities at the expense of the locals.

Obviously, Mr Ong Ye Kung is far removed from the realities on the ground, shielded from the truth by his team of grassroots bootlickers.

The grim spectre of Singapore going through a protracted state of extremely low growth and possibly a prolonged period of recession will bite deep and hard, than only will the hungry people will rise up and say “Screw you, enough of your bullshit”, I want change.


This is a letter from one of our readers, Frank.